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C California Style

Arriving at the eco-resort by boat.
A fleet of kayaks at The Stanford Inn.
Kayaking on the BIG RIVER in Mendocino County.
Driving through REDWOOD NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS.
The view from Room 317 at INN OF THE LOST COAST.
Gioacchini’s Lost Coast road trip eventually led him to the SIX RIVERS NATIONAL FOREST—a luminous green following days of rain.
The harbor at The STANFORD INN eco-resort as viewed from the BIG RIVER Bridge in Mendocino County.
A morning vista near PETROLIA in Lost Coast.
“You can feel the power of the ocean here,” says MANFREDI GIOACCHINI. “The only sound is the water collapsing on the rocks.”
BLACK SANDS BEACH before sunset in LOST COAST.

Road to Nowhere

by C California Style

Set out for the Lost Coast, one of California’s most mystical trails

The 655 miles that make up California Highway 1—stretching from Leggett in Mendocino County down to Orange County, near Dana Point—are among the most cinematic in the world, luring adventurers and day-trippers alike. But for those in search of a less-documented path, there’s Lost Coast, a roughly 100-mile northern section of wilderness between Rockport and Ferndale (which picks up where California Highway 1 ends), whose primordial terrain is accessed by winding and rutted routes dotted with stray cattle. Cellphone reception is scarce, gas stations few and far between. It is at this bend that you’ll encounter hiking routes to the kind of black-sand beach and craggy cliffscape you thought you had to travel to Costa Rica to witness—and you might even spot a gray, humpback or killer whale. We asked photographer Manfredi Gioacchini, known both for his arresting portraits of such artists as Ed Ruscha and Mark Bradford, as well as his landscape travelogues of the American West, to set a course of Pacific views you have to go the extra mile to see. Winding his way up to Redwood National and State Parks, with a hiking stop in the King Range mountains after canoeing in Mendocino, he discovers a road trip unlike any other, ultimately heading east for Six Rivers National Forest. “Lost Coast lives in a bubble—it has this wildness about it,” he says. “It’s something else.”

Written by MELISSA GOLDSTEIN.
Photography by MANFREDI GIOACCHINI.

 

This article originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of C Magazine.