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C California Style

Brass accents, graphic wallpaper and dramatic colors are Kaye-Honey's "new vintage" signatures.PHOTO: Eron Rauch.
Brass accents, graphic wallpaper and dramatic colors are Kaye-Honey's "new vintage" signatures. PHOTO: Eron Rauch.
Mary McDonald. PHOTO: Ninelle Efremova.
A Manuel Canovas shade accent and painted floor transform small spaces. PHOTO: Tristan Davison.
The cover of Mcdonald's book and a dining room featured in its pages reveal her high-glam touches such as black-and-white floors and ornate light fixtures. PHOTO: 150-151 [Simon Upton] © Simon Upton.
A Manuel Canovas shade accent and painted floor transform small spaces. PHOTO: Tristan Davison.
Tamara Kaye-Honey. PHOTO: Peden + Munk.
Alison Blumenfeld. PHOTO: Coral Von Zumwalt.
The cover of Mcdonald's book and a dining room featured in its pages reveal her high-glam touches such as black-and-white floors and ornate light fixtures.

Fashionable Living

by intern

Punctuating inventive spaces with statement-making accessories, three Golden State designers let their former careers in fashion inform new interiors projects

TAMARA KAYE-HONEY
Before she was updating sprawling Altadena, CA, estates with her playful, “new vintage” style,Tamara Kaye-Honey was a clothing buyer for Bergdorf Goodman. At House of Honey, her South Pasadena store, she stocks re-invented vintage accents, like brass side tables
and Italian ceramic cockatoos, all of which she loves to blend with punchy hues and patterns.

Which fashion rules apply to interior design? Once I complete a space, I remove one piece. This came from fashion: Always add then edit.

How do you quickly refresh a room?
Layer. The more patterns and texture, the richer the feel. Stay within the parameters of a palette and mix up scale. houseofhoney.la.

ALISON BLUMENFIELD
This L.A.-based, San Francisco-bred designer studied at the Art Center College of Design and worked at Esprit de Corps before she started a namesake line of silk jersey separates. Whether Alison Blumenfeld is re-thinking a Pacific Heights penthouse or a ’30s Moderne in L.A., she has an eye for classical proportions and sculptural accessories.

How does your fashion background inform your work?

Fashion pulls from the past and tries to make something feel “new” again. This is vital with interiors. Furniture is expensive. Being able to re-imagine something, allowing it to change, is much of what we do.

What are your favorite home accents? There is no substitute for art. As single pieces or in clusters, it is transforming. I love a Polaroid or personal memento littered in and lots of flattering, layered lighting. blumenfeldinteriors.com.

MARY MCDONALD
Bravo’s “Million Dollar Decorator” star Mary McDonald has earned a reputation as a “fearless accessorizer.” Her affinity for color and pattern is due, in part, to her training at Parsons in New York and a career as a milliner. This year, she’s introducing new trimmings with Schumacher, a rug collection (see p.78) and her fourth book, Mary McDonald Interiors: The Allure of Style (Rizzoli).

Do you “accessorize” a room like an outfit? I think of lamps as earrings and see them as an opportunity to add a bit of spice. Like in fashion, you choose your “wow” accessory.

How do you quickly refresh a room? Try tailored slipcovers in bold colors, like red. Or paint your floor and leave it bare like a loft; it looks totally different with the same pieces. marymcdonaldinc.com.

Written and edited by Christine Lennon