TOP 5: THE FEBRUARY 2024 CALIFORNIA HOT LIST

Each month we share five unmissable things to see and do in the Golden State. You heard it here first.

Words by KELSEY McKINNON, ELIZABETH VARNELL, and S. IRENE VIRBILA

 

POINT REYES
A Beautifully Restored Bayside Lodge Reopens

PHOTO: Brian Ferry.

Nature lovers with a penchant for luxury travel, meet the newly transformed Lodge at Marconi, set within 62 acres of the Marconi National State Park overlooking the Tomales Bay. Originally built in 1914 by Guglielmo Marconi, the inventor of radio, as a signal-receiving station, it later became the infamous home of the alternative lifestyle cult Synanon in the 1960s before it was by purchased by the  philanthropic San Francisco Foundation, which later gifted it to the California Department of Parks and Recreation in 1989, who turned it into a conference center. Now safely in the hands of Oliver Hospitality, the 45 guest rooms and suites have been reimagined by New York–based Home Studios, and Bay Area firm Dune Hai designed the grounds. In keeping with modernist Sea Ranch style, the camp-esque environment has a residential vibe with plenty of communal spaces for people to work, read a book, or enjoy a glass of wine. The rooms boast a highly curated assortment of custom furnishings, Heath Ceramics tiles, and amenities, from plant-based Born Bathing products to waffle robes, electric kettles, and retro rotary-style phones. Televisions, however, are purposefully missing: The goal is to encourage guests to unplug from digital diversions and reconnect with nature and each other. For that, there are more than 3.5 miles of walking and hiking trails, where curious travelers can even find remnants of Marconi’s old transmission towers. 18500 Highway 1, Marshall, 415-663-9020; lodgeatmarconi.com. K.M.

HOLLYWOOD
These Cowboy Cutouts Put a Positive Spin on Negative Space

Jose Dávila, Untitled (Cowboy), 2023.

Richard Prince’s cowboys loom large in Jose Dávila’s first solo Los Angeles show because of the absence of men on horseback rather than their presence. The main figures of Prince’s Untitled (cowboy) series — rephotographed Marlboro ads, sans text, originally published in Time magazine — are cut from Dávila’s revisionist works comprising his show, Photographic Memory, at Sean Kelly. His incisions reference the Mexican folk-art tradition of papel picado (cut paper), and the Guadalajara-based artist uses the technique here to explore negative space in an homage to and a critique of the original works. Whereas Prince’s images sparked questions of authorship, lawsuits, and an examination of the motif as an American symbol, Dávila takes the conversation a step further, asking viewers to fill in the central image from memory. It’s an exercise locals are well-equipped to take on given LACMA’s 2018 show of the Prince series. Through March 9. 1357 Highland Ave., L.A., 310-499-0843; skny.com. E.V.

WEST HOLLYWOOD
Two Fashion Legends Combine Design Powers on a New Pop-Up

 

A playful game of cat and mouse is under way at the new Tory Burch pop-up in Los Angeles, created in collaboration with Humberto Leon. The space’s façade and interiors are adorned with supersize versions of expressive animal portraits shot by German portrait photographer Walter Schels. Burch emblazoned his cats, lions, and rabbits across her Resort 2024 collection’s tops, skirts, and pants, all hanging inside. Leon, the Opening Ceremony cofounder and L.A. native, commissioned Mexican artist Aranza Garcia of Chuch Estudio to create a series of pale pink ceramic seats and vases shaped like giant strawberries for the space, open through the end of the year while the line’s Rodeo Drive flagship is renovated. Floors, shelves, and displays inside are covered in shag carpet evoking cat towers. Additional catnip includes the first drop of Burch’s Spring 2024 collection with its hoop dresses, silk jersey goddess frocks, and Pierced wedges, curated by Leon. 8483 Melrose Ave., West Hollywood, 323-300-6068; toryburch.com. E.V.

BEVERLY HILLS
Hip, Hip, Hooray: Cipriani Lands in L.A.

LEFT: Simon Tchoukriel. RIGHT: Courtesy of Cipriani.

When Giuseppe Cipriani opened Harry’s Bar in 1931 on a quiet side street in Venice, Italy, he surely never imagined the cozy little place — where he served the likes of Ernest Hemingway, Katharine Hepburn, Orson Welles, and Peggy Guggenheim fresh Bellinis and calf’s liver and onions — would be replicated all over the world. You can dine at Cipriani in New York City, Miami, Dubai, Uruguay, Milan, Hong Kong, and Istanbul — and now Beverly Hills. Designed by Florentine architect Michele Bonan, the space shines with Murano chandeliers, lots of polished wood, tobacco leather chairs, and dark green velvet banquettes. The menu proposes Harry’s signature dishes, including carpaccio alla Cipriani, baked tagliolini with ham, risotto primavera, and that svelte calf’s liver. Because we’re talking Beverly Hills — and the first Cipriani in California — there will also be a patio for outdoor dining, along with a chic jazz café opening this Spring. 362 N. Camden Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-866-5060; cipriani.com/cipriani-beverly-hills. S.I.V.

PALM SPRINGS
It’s Time to Peek Inside Some Midcentury Architectural Marvels

Sinatra Estate Twin Palms tour. PHOTO: David A. Lee.

This month, the annual Palm Springs Modernism Show beckons design-minded travelers with a treasure trove of 21st-century pieces from exhibitors from across the country, along with home tours of the most iconic addresses in the Coachella Valley. Think of the MTV show Cribs, but for desert-bound midcentury modern devotees. The artist Shag opens the doors to his reimagined midcentury modern abode that’s akin to walking into a life-size Shag painting. There’s a tour of the 1967 James McNaughton Hollywood Regency-style home led by homeowners fashion designer Candice Held and artist Tristan Gittens, plus a look inside the House of Tomorrow (where Elvis and Priscilla Presley honeymooned in 1967) and residences from legends such as John Lautner and Albert Frey. Inspired to add a dash of yesteryear to your own home? The show will boast Sputnik lamps and Paul McCobb chairs galore to bring back home after all the garden tours, lectures, and parties. February 15–25; modernismweek.com. K.M.

 

February 2024

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